Global Warming: French Scientists Capture CO2

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Institute of Nanotechnology Forum Index -> Nanoecology
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nanoorg
Site Admin


Joined: 16 Mar 2004
Posts: 1392

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 1:26 pm    Post subject: Global Warming: French Scientists Capture CO2 Reply with quote

Capturing and storing CO2 has become one of the most eagerly-explored areas of research in global warming. The idea is to sequestrate the gas as it is being burned by power plants, factories and vehicles, rather than let it escape into the atmosphere where it will contribute to the greenhouse effect.

Unfortunately, many popular ideas on how exactly to sequester the CO2 are simply not practical. However, a new team of French researchers, led by Gérard Férey at the University of Versailles , have decided to skip the pumping of CO2 underground, and focus their efforts on nanotechnology, breaking a record in the process. Their new material, dubbed MIL-101, has been officially called “the best carbon sequestration material” bar none. 1m 3 is capable of holding 400m 3 of gas, compared to the 200m 3 that the best commercially available technology can provide.

MIL-101, also known as chromium terephthalate, can accomplish this because its structure is only 2.9 to 3.4 nanometers thick, giving the substance a surface area of over 6000m 2 per single gram. The structure is also porous, which allows the small CO 2 molecules to become trapped, making it ideal for carbon capture directly from power plants, tailpipes, and smokestacks. The technology also holds great promise for the storage of methane and hydrogen gas, making it a possible candidate for fuel storage in fuel-cell powered vehicles.

A cubic metre (35 cubic feet) of the new substance, called MIL-101, is able to capture 400 cu. metres (14,125 cu. feet) of CO2, thanks to pores 3.5 nanometres (billionths of a metre) across, the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) said in a press release. It outperforms current commercial nano-powders which have maximum pores of 2.2 nanometres. The CNRS team is to report on MIL-101 in a forthcoming issue of Langmuir, a journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS).


Source: http://www2.cnrs.fr/presse/communique/1334.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Institute of Nanotechnology Forum Index -> Nanoecology All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1
 

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group