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Nanotechnology Report

Radiation Detection Materials Markets - 2011

Category: Materials Published: Aug 2011 View Contents
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The radiation detection industry is about to see accelerated growth reasons ranging from ongoing homeland security concerns to greater concerns about safety in the nuclear power industry. Radiation equipment for both diagnostics and therapeutic applications will also proliferate as populations continue to age. Such trends will create new opportunities for the firms that make radiation detection materials of various kinds. These opportunities will present themselves not just in terms of increases in the volume of materials required, but also in terms of the type of materials. The radiation detection market is looking for materials that can provide more accurate and useful readings and also for those that can lower costs.

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Traditionally, radiation detection materials have been classified into two different groups; scintillation detector materials and semiconductor-based detectors. Sodium iodide has been the industry standard for scintillation detectors, but is very fragile and moisture sensitive. With the heightened need for radiation detection, we believe that there are now growing opportunities for new materials such as Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO), Lutetium Oxysilicate (LSO) and Strontium Iodide. All of these newer materials are showing potential to provide higher resolution, lower cost and more physically robust solutions than the current Sodium Iodide detectors.

As far as semiconductor radiation detectors go, current materials such as Si and Ge detectors have excellent sensitivity and resolution, but have the drawback of needing to be cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures for optimal performance. While such cooling is routinely done for medical and scientific applications, it is impractical for pervasive homeland security and mobile applications. As a result, we see new business potential from new alloys that have the potential for a similar resolution to Si and Ge but with good performance at room temperature and again at lower cost.

This new report which we believe to be the first of its kind provides a detailed analysis of the opportunities for firms in, or about to enter, the radiation detection material sector. It provides a deep understanding of the commercial potential for the new materials and discussion of the strategies that are being deployed by firms active in this sector. It also includes a granular eight-year forecast of radiation detection materials broken out by material types and market application.

The radiation detection industry is about to see accelerated growth reasons ranging from ongoing homeland security concerns to greater concerns about safety in the nuclear power industry.