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Nanotechnology Report

Printed and Thin Film Transistors and Memory

Printed and Thin Film Transistors and Memory
Category: Electronics Published: Jul 2010 Pages: 292 View Contents
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Electronic copies include a five user licence. Contact andrew.stewart@nano.org.uk for more information.

Printed electronics will be a $300 billion market within 20 years. The largest segment will be printed transistors and memory. They will drive lighting, displays, signage, electronic products, medical disposables, smart packaging, smart labels and much more besides. The chemical, plastics, printing, electronics and other industries are cooperating to make it happen. Already, over 100 organisations are developing printed transistors and memory, with first products being sold in 2008.

More Details

The growth over the longer timescale, from 2009-2029, will be very similar to the early growth of the silicon chip market in the same interval. In other words, the twenty years from 1978 to 1998 saw a similar starting and finishing value of sales of silicon chips. History is repeating itself with the printed equivalent over the next twenty years, though not by taking much market share from silicon chips in the first fifteen years. Do not follow the herd into the well aired aspects of this subject. Gain advantage by understanding all the important aspects and opportunities.

Who should read this report

This report addresses two types of reader. Industrialists, investors and researchers with scientific training can read the report in the order presented. For the first time, they will see the big picture of what is happening and about to happen across the whole world in this subject. This includes the profiles, activities and intentions of 150 leading organisations in this field. We analyse and compare what is happening in 16 countries. Such information is not gathered in any other document. The report also gives the rapidly evolving choices of materials, device designs, chemistry and manufacturing processes for these devices - again a unique analysis. However, this report will also be useful for those with only a rudimentary understanding of science and engineering who seek to understand how the printed electronics revolution will greatly benefit society while creating billion dollar businesses and when and where this will happen.

We start with some descriptions appropriate for the beginner, opening up the subject with as little complexity and jargon as possible.

Forecasts and Applications

The report assesses the market and opportunity in different ways, such as forecasts by material type (organic vs inorganic), application (Display driver, RFID etc), flexible, printed and much more. However, the immediately accessible markets for printed transistors are commonly described as being back plane drivers for displays and use in RFID but that is misleading. We give the big picture - something not previously available - and also look at the impediments to successful commercialization of these components, in an honest and balanced appraisal. Forecasts are given for the next ten years and beyond.

All the Chemistries, Geometries and Processes

We cover the big picture - the full range of organic and inorganic chemistries that can be printed or thin film. Technical progress, companies and impediments are given, and their applications appraised. Detailed profiles of over 150 companies are given. Whether you intend to be a user, seller or researcher, consider the new InGaZnO semiconductors, the single layer geometry, the multi-function transistors, the printed silicon transistors and many other advances.

Progress by Territory

Understand the enormous amount of work going on in Korea, Japan, Taiwan, the USA, Germany and the UK. See why no printing technology is ideal and what comes next. Although the press talks of transistors only working at the lower frequencies and modest memory capability in printed form, some of these devices work at terahertz frequency and some promise a gigabyte on a postage stamp for only a few cents and progress with ISO-capable printed RFID tags.

Printed and thin film transistor circuits will become a $4 billion market in 10 years